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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 16, 2017 12:00am-12:31am BST

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this is bbc news, i'm alpa patel. our top stories: turkey's president promises to punish his enemies, as he marks a year since a failed military coup. this is the scene live in ankara, where he is due to address crowds in front of parliament. thousands march through hong kong after chinese nobel peace prize winner liu xiaobo is buried at sea. the former british prime minister tony blair says eu leaders are willing to compromise in order to persuade the uk to remain a member. if we were looking at this from the point of view of the interests of the country, one option within this negotiation would be britain staying within a reformed european union. also coming up: tears ofjoy as spain's garbine muguruza beats venus williams to win her first wimbledon title. hello and welcome to bbc news.
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we begin in turkey, which is marking one year since the failed military coup against president erdogan. tens of thousands have been attending this event in istanbul to mark the anniversary. president erdogan spoke at the rally against the soldiers who tried to seize powerfrom him. he said we need to chop off the heads of traitors. he is due to address parliament in ankara shortly, at the time it was bombed. the failed coup was a traumatic event in the country's history. 260 people were killed. more than 2,000 people were injured. in the aftermath, more than 150,000 state employees have been sacked, and another 50,000 people have been arrested. mark lowen has been at the event in istanbul, and sent this report. they returned to where
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the nightmare began. seized by the tanks a year ago, it is now renamed 15 july martyrs bridge, tens of thousands celebrating victory today. they call it turkey's second independence, joy and relief clear, and they remember the 260 killed as the people stood up to the plotters. last year, a lion, that lion is turkish nation, was tried to strangle, by cats. they are militants with tanks, f—16s, bullets, rifles. but they couldn't strangle the lion. it was the greatest ever attack on the turkish state, rogue soldiers bombing buildings, blocking roads, and driving
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tanks into civilians. by dawn, it had failed. then came the purge, 50,000 arrested, and 150,000 sacked or suspended. a year ago, there was unity against the coup, but tonight the opposition says it is not coming here. deep cracks have opened up over the mass arrests and dismissals. for half the country, the 15th of july marks turkey's rebirth. the other half says it is killing off what is left of turkish democracy. as night fell, their hero arrived. he was almost captured in the coup, but president erdogan emerged stronger, and tightened his grip. translation: i would like to thank all our citizens who protected and defended their freedom, democracy, religion, state, government, and future and independence. i thank each and every individual member of our nation. elsewhere, they are fighting back against the purge, protests in support of two academics
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on hunger strike for four months, since they were fired. alongside, a human rights monument is now sealed off, a bleak metaphor for turkey's plight. translation: one day your name is on a list, and you're struck off. your life is turned upside down. you're killed off by the system. they want to live, but for their demands to be met. i can't think of that alternative. the celebrations went on alongside the new martyrs monument, the 15th of july now etched into the country, for better or worse. a year since the national trauma, and turkey still torn. in the last hour i spoke with bbc journalist seref isler, who was in turkey at the time of the coup. i asked him what he made of president erdogan‘s speech. well, i mean, i have been a
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journalist for as long as he has beenin journalist for as long as he has been in power, and i have to say that this was easily one of the most religious, one of the most emotional speeches that he has ever made. the rhetoric was very strong. so using phrases such as these traitors will have to jump over the pawns, that we need to chop off their heads, we wa nt need to chop off their heads, we want execution, bringing back the death penalty, and then him saying that if this... it is a democracy in turkey, so if parliament were to pass a law bringing back the death penalty, but i will approve it, was another phrase he said. and it was other things, like again, another phrase he said. and it was otherthings, like again, stomping on their heads. about half of his speech was basically taking on the leader of the opposition, of the republican people's party. so the
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rhetoric was very strong, and very passionate, very emotional. in a way, it appealed to the emotions of the people on the streets, and who came to the rally, who would have felt this nationalistic surge starting from a year ago today. and we should remember that the yeronga is still a state of emergency in place. when do you think that might be lifted? mr erdogan has hinted that he would be willing to lift it, 01’ that he would be willing to lift it, or rather that he would be ok with it being lifted soon. however, he has always pointed out that he wants it to continue until they are, in his words, rid of all the traces within the system. hence the 150,000 who have been purged from their jobs. so mr erdogan says that these people had links to terrorist
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organisations, and he needs the state of emergency powers to be able to effectively and efficiently get rid of them in the system. however, of course, his critics say that these people don't have any appeals process , these people don't have any appeals process, nothing. their names are published in the official gazette, where all the laws are published, under the state of emergency laws, and they are jobless in a second. and we must remember that you were actually in turkey when the coup happened. what was that like?m actually in turkey when the coup happened. what was that like? it was one of the most traumatic evenings that i have witnessed in turkey. to the extent that you of course and remembering every detail. i was at my friend's wedding, and two jets flew over. my dad called and said, do you know what is going on? i said i don't know. i turned on the tv and there was a coup message being read on state tv. and then this frantic drive to our hotel, and left, right and centre i saw people trying to get every bit of cash out of the atm, food from bakeries. people were
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really preparing themselves for the worst. and later, of course, as we all know now, the democracy message was rather... the imams at mosques wa nted was rather... the imams at mosques wanted people to go on the street and defend democracy, and when people took to the streets they were confronted by tanks. and it wasjust pandemonium, for one night, when no one slept. thousands of people have marched through the streets of hong kong following the burial at sea of the chinese nobel peace prize winner liu xiaobo the largely silent crowd walked to china's representative office to show their support for mr liu, who died on thursday. he died in hospital while serving an 11—year prison sentence for his political activism. here is michael bristow. 0ut out at sea, and an unknown location, the remains of liu xiaobo were placed in an urn. with his wives and
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—— wife and relatives looking on, the ashes were committed to the water. this video was released to suggest that in death, as in life, they had treated the nobel peace prize winner with dignity. after the ceremony, the authorities put liu xiaobo's eldest brother in front of the cameras, to praise the communist pa rty‘s humanity. the cameras, to praise the communist party's humanity. translation: first of all, only half of my family, and especially of my brother's wife, all the things the government has done since my brother's death were all done at the request of his family. each and every one was met with satisfaction. he was led away before journalists could ask why the nobel laureate was buried at sea. was it so laureate was buried at sea. was it so that his admirers would have nowhere to go to remember him? mr liu 's nowhere to go to remember him? mr liu ‘s wife has been under house arrest since her husband won the nobel prize in 2010. her mental health has deteriorated, and officials suggested she was now
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every woman. but that claim has yet to be tested. liu xiaobo was given a nobel award after being jailed for calling for political change in china. in prison, little was heard of him. then suddenly, a few weeks ago, the authorities announced he was receiving treatment for liver cancer. china's leaders despised liu xiaobo and what he stood for in life. they tried to control the manner of his death. 0ther nobel peace prize brings worldwide recognition, and so even china had no choice but to honour his passing. let's take a look at some of the other stories making the news: israel says it will reopen the sensitive holy site in jerusalem on sunday. the compound known tojews as the temple mount and to muslims as haram al—sharif mosque was closed after two israeli police officers were shot dead on friday by three israeli—arab gunmen, who were chased and killed. china has warned that india will face embarrassment if it doesn't pull its troops from doklam,
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a region claimed by china in the himalayas. chinese state media said there was no room for negotiations until india withdraws. india says it sent troops there last month to stop the chinese from building a new road on territory claimed by bhutan. the international airport serving the libyan city of benghazi has officially reopened for commercial traffic, amid a heavy security presence, after a three—year closure caused by fighting. the airport in libya's second city shut amid escalating conflict in 2014. tony blair, the former prime minister of britain, has suggested the uk could win concessions on immigration to try to keep it within the european union. the former british prime minister said european leaders might be prepared to offer a compromise on the free movement of people. his comments, though, have been dismissed by senior conservative and labour figures. 0ur political correspondent eleanor garnier reports. balancing the needs of the uk
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economy at the same time as getting greater control of britain's borders is a key issue in the brexit debate. but the former labour prime minister has suggested political change in france has opened the path to compromise. tony blair claims the eu could be willing to make concessions on the free movement of people, to allow the uk to stay in a reformed eu. britain benefits enormously from that freedom of movement. however, the question is whether there are changes, qualifications to it, not alteration of the indivisibility of the principle, but qualifications to it around the things that concern people. but those claims directly contradict what those in brussels are saying, that the uk must accept free movement without exception 01’ nuance.
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i'm not going to disclose conversations i had within europe, but i'm not saying this simply on the basis of a whim. some of those who campaigned to leave the eu says there is no evidence to back up mr blair's claim. the eu itself has made it absolutely clear that the four freedoms, including freedom of movement, are indivisible, as they've called it. the chief negotiator, barnier, has said that. they took four minutes to agree those guidelines. there is no debate in the eu. it's complete nonsense, it's just another attempt to undermine brexit. campaigning in southampton, the current labour leader rejected his predecessor's position, and says his party respects the result of the referendum. anyone is entitled to give their views, and i listen to all of them. the views we have is that we want to see tariff—free access to the european market, protection of eu nationals, and protection of the labour rights
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and environmental conditions and consumer rights we achieved through european union membership. this latest intervention from tony blair will not change the government's approach to negotiations. ministers say the former labour prime minister is demonstrating again that he is out of touch with voters. but mr blair has reopened the debate on the central issue of brexit, a decision he says is the biggest the country has faced since the second world war. once, he helped determine britain's place in the world. now, this former prime minister must settle for commenting from the sidelines. eleanor garnier, bbc news. stay with us on bbc news. still to come: all the latest sport, including spain's garbine muguruza, who has denied venus williams her sixth wimbledon title in the women's final. the flamboyant italian fashion designer gianni versace has been shot dead in florida. the multi—millionaire was gunned down outside his home in the exclusive south beach district of miami. emergency services across central europe are stepping up their efforts to contain the worse
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floods this century. nearly 100 people have been killed. broadway is traditionally called the "great white way" by americans, but tonight it is completely blacked out. it is a timely reminder to all americans of the problems that the energy crisis has brought to them. 200 years ago today, a huge parisian crowd stormed the bastille prison — the first act of the revolution which was to topple the french monarchy. today, hundreds of thousands throng the champs—elysees for the traditional military parade. finally, fairy penguins have been staggering ashore and collapsing after gorging themselves on a huge shoal of their favourite food, pilchards. some had eaten so much they could barely stand. this is bbc news. the latest headlines: the turkish president is promising to punish his enemies — as he addresses rallies to mark
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a year since a failed military coup. thousands of people have marched through the streets of hong kong to remember chinese nobel peace prize winner, liu xiaobo, after he was buried at sea. let's go to iraq, where the government has finally declared victory in mosul against the so—called islamic state. it's after a lengthy battle which destroyed much of the city, killed thousands of people and forced almost a million from their homes. two weeks ago we reported on the rescue of 20 children who were being used as human shields by islamic state militants. well, there have been emotional scenes as some of those children were reunited with their parents. 0ur correspondent nafisah kohnavard has been following their stories from just outside mosul. and emotional moment. of the three
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yea rs and emotional moment. of the three years apart, this boy recognised his father. when the so—called islamic state attacked their village, he thought he had lost all his children. it is only now that he realises he survived. for years, the son, who has learning difficulties, was held in a mosul orphanage by isis. this was the scene when we reported on the release of others in the orphanage. almost 30 children here were being used as human shields by isis. and he was one of them. tired and hungry, the children we re them. tired and hungry, the children were rescued by iraqi security forces. the pictures went viral. are
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both like many other parents, saw his child in the bbc report and travelled here as quickly as he could. translation: when i saw this picture it felt like i was being given all the riches in the world. now they are out of mosul and the children are safe. but not all reunions are going well. these girls we re reunions are going well. these girls were just reunions are going well. these girls werejust six reunions are going well. these girls were just six years old when they we re were just six years old when they were taken by isis. they no longer recognise their family. these children have been separated from theirfamilies for children have been separated from their families for almost three yea rs. their families for almost three years. they have no memories of theirformer years. they have no memories of their former lives. years. they have no memories of theirformer lives. and years. they have no memories of their former lives. and uncle years. they have no memories of theirformer lives. and uncle tries to help remember, but it is difficult after having lived under isis for so long. the father shows me his daughter ‘s id card and tells
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me his daughter ‘s id card and tells me he is still shocked. translation: idid not me he is still shocked. translation: i did not think i would ever see her again. i thought that was maybe a 1% chance. when i saw her picture on facebook and heard that they had been freed, i could not believe it. abbas and his son are getting ready to leave for home. like so many here, they are together again, ready to try and rebuild their lives. now she was a trailblazer in herfield. maryam mirzakhani became the first woman to win the fields medal, an award seen as the nobel prize of maths. sadly the ao—year—old iranian has died in the us from breast cancer. iranian president hassan rouhani has said her death has caused "great sorrow". but there has also been criticism of professor mirzakhani's publications. and photoshopped images have appeared of her wearing a head—scarf. one person who knew her well
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is professor caroline series. she spoke to us about her life and achievements. she was an absolutely wonderful person, and a brilliant mathematician. the fact that she was iranian and the fact that she was first woman to win this prestigious fields medal, she was just such an icon and a role model and inspiration around the world. she will be sorely missed. it was the way in which she managed to combine ideas that, perhaps, other people knew, but she combined them together in a completely unexpected and remarkable way. she sent me a cow, and remarkable way. she sent me a copy, a draft of her thesis and
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ph.d. dissertation before was finally submitted and the way she put together ideas which, really, i had known about but she was able to combine sings and draw astonishing and remarkable conclusion is with them. quite cleanly and... not simply, it is technical, but, somehow, to get to some gold would be completely unexpected and turn around the way you would think about the whole subject. it's been a busy day of sport. here's hugh ferris with all the details. there's a new name on the wimbledon honours board. garbine muguruza has won herfirst title with a straight—sets win over five—time champion venus williams. the spaniard won nine games in a row to complete a 7—5 6—0 victory under the centre court roof. she denied the 37—year—old american
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her first she denied the 37—year—old american herfirst major she denied the 37—year—old american her first major title four years which would have made her the oldest grand slam champion in the open era. she is happy to see her name up there with those of the others. she is happy to see her name up there with those of the othersm was amazing. like i said before, i a lwa ys was amazing. like i said before, i always look at the wall and see, you know, the names in the history and i lost that final and that one i was close and i did not want to lose this time because i know the difference. i really know the difference. i really know the difference of making a final, which is incredible, but i am so happy it is incredible, but i am so happy it is then our. she played really well. she played top of tennis. she displayed a better match and i have had a great two weeks and i am looking forward to a rest now over the summer. there is always
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something to learn from matches you win and from those you don't. there is something definitely for me to learn from this. at the same time, it is always about looking forward as well. roger federer will aim to win an eighth men's final wimbledon. marin cilic stands in his way, although he has only won once against federer before. it makes me happy. mark king history here at wimbledon, it is a big deal. i love this tournament. 0r my dreams came true here as a player so my dreams came true here as a player so to have another chance to go for number eight now and be so close now at this stage is a great feeling and, yeah... unbelievably excited and, yeah... unbelievably excited andi and, yeah... unbelievably excited and i hope i can play one more good match. 11 finals, all these records, it is great but it does not give me the title quite yet. that's why i
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came busier. i am close now and i just need to stay focused. england have left themselves an uphill battle to avoid losing the second test against south africa. they slumped to 205 all out on the second day at trent bridge. captainjoe root the only player to make a half century. the tourists ended the day on 75 for one to lead by 205. in colombo, sri la nka one to lead by 205. in colombo, sri lanka trailed zimbabwe in a 1—off test in which craig irwin excelled. india have defeated new zealand to reach the semifinal in the women's world cup. india skidded new zealand out for just 79 runs. world cup. india skidded new zealand out forjust 79 runs. raj had made 109 for india, and they will now play australia. england will meet
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south africa. stage 1a of the two would france was one by an australian. the australian taking to the lead. chris room regained the yellow jersey. his lead the lead. chris room regained the yellowjersey. his lead is now 19 seconds with six stages remaining. i want to take an hour to ankara but we're president erdogan is now about to address parliament. it is to do as the anniversary of the failed coup in turkey. and he has already addressed a rally in istanbul. he said there that he wanted to see the heads of traders chopped off. plenty more coming up in the next few hours. —— heads of traitors topped
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off. this was the sunset in cambridgeshire and a little earlier in the day when we saw cloud breaking upa in the day when we saw cloud breaking up a little through the likes of the midlands and northern ireland, temperatures lifted readily, up to 2a, 20 five degrees because of the wedge of warm humid air that was setting in place. fast forward to the start of sunday morning, that wedge of warm air is confined to the southern half of the country where it will be quite cloudy, misty murky and drizzly and places. a warm start to the day but something cool and fresher. that will be where we see the best of the sunshine during sunday morning. northern ireland, scotland, roll at the sunshine the very blustery wind 01’ more the sunshine the very blustery wind or more than scotland, gales and exposed spots of meaning showers into the mix. thinks will be bright
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as this cold front slips southwards. along the line of the front—end to the south will be a cloudy start to the south will be a cloudy start to the day, very misty, murky and drizzly for parts of wales south—west. cloudy as well across east anglia and the south—east but 20 degrees in london even at nine in the morning. anyway to the south of this front, that is where we will have the warmest and the most humid conditions. equally, the most cloud. mcleod will start to break up and it could lift temperatures to 2627 degrees. further south—west, blustery showers across scotland. wimbledon, or it looks largely dry. things are brightening up a little bit of the day goes on and we sat there is just the threat of a shower, perhaps a third of a cent chance of a light shower as the front chance of a light shower as the fro nt m oves chance of a light shower as the front moves its way through during the latter part of sunday. into
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monday, the front clears away and allows this area of high pressure to build its way in. that means a beautiful start to the week. if you like warm weather and sunshine, that is. there will be a lot of sunshine across the country with cloud close to the far south. 20, 20 six degrees, some spots could get close to 30. another warm day to come on tuesday, most places dry some sunshine but notice, down to the south, do not take this literally but there is an increasing chance that we will see thunderstorms spreading up from the south. there could be at thunderstorms and where on wednesday as they clear away it will turn cool and fresh for the end of the week. this is bbc news. the headlines: the turkish president has addressed a mass rally to mark a year since an attempted military coup was put down, promising to punish his enemies. at least 260 people died in the coup attempt. in its wake, the government has sacked 150,000 state employees. thousands of people have marched
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through hong kong to remember chinese nobel peace prize winner liu xiaobo. he was buried at sea after a funeral service. mr liu died in hospital while serving a prison sentence for his activism. former british prime minister tony blair has suggested the european union could be willing to make concessions on the free movement of people to allow the uk to remain in the eu. spain's garbine muguruza has beaten venus williams in the wimbledon women's final. now on bbc news: with the women's us 0pen golf taking place this weekend, as part of the bbc women's season of sport, sarah mulkerrins travels
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